Art History Overview College Assignments

Week of January 16-20, 2017

Tuesday 1/17
Students will continue working on their Modern Art Research Presentation assignment in class today.  These assignments will be due on Thursday, 1/19 and will be presented during the final exam time.

Thursday 1/19
B2 Art History Final Exam

Students will present their Modern Artist Research Presentation during the final exam time (9:55-11:45).  All presentations and handouts must be submitted through the shared Google folder before 9:55 on this day.  
Art History students must have their textbooks to return at the end of the final exam period.

Week of January 9-13, 2017

Monday 1/9
Students will read page 819 in the textbook on "Symbolism" and add Symbolism to their "Artistic Movements Since 1700" Google presentation with dates, ideas, hallmarks, and artists - Edvard Munch and Gustav Klimt.  Mr. Lamp will briefly introduced Symbolism to the class.  Next, students will work in groups of 3 on the assigned "Symbolists and Rodin" Google presentation.  Each member of the group will select either Edvard Munch's The Scream, Gustav Klimt's The Kiss, or Auguste Rodin's Burghers of Calais, research the artist, complete the assigned graphic organizer, and find 3 additional works by the artist.  At the end of class, they will share their findings with the other group members.

Wednesday 1/11

Students will take Slide Quiz #11 at the beginning of class.
​Students will learn about Modern architecture today in class.  They will first read a brief article on modern architecture and a Wikipedia entry on modern architecture.  This will allow us to establish an idea on what modern architects wished to achieve in their designs, and why they look so different from classical, Renaissance, and Neoclassical structures.  Students will then complete a Google document on Le Corbusier's Villa Savoye independently and we will have a brief discussion on the assignment.  Next, students will complete a Google document on Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater, and we will have a discussion on this structure as well.

Colombia University Introduction to Modern Architecture
Wikipedia entry on Modern Architecture

Friday 1/13
Students will be assigned their Modern Art Research Presentation assignment in class today.  These assignments will be due on Thursday, 1/19 and will be presented during the final exam time.

Week of January 2-6, 2017

Tuesday 1/3
Students will learn about the Rococo style and art during the Enlightenment.  They will begin by comparing and contrasting The Swing and A Philosopher Giving a Lecture at the Orrery without any context, purely examining the formal qualities of the work.  They will then read about the Rococo and watch a video on The Swing and complete a graphic organizer on the work.  Mr. Lamp will give a brief lecture on Rococo.  Students will then read an article and the textbook on the Enlightenment and A Philosopher Giving a Lecture at the Orrery and complete a graphic organizer on the work.  Mr. Lamp will give a brief lecture on the Enlightenment.  We will conclude with a brief compare and contrast exercise after the students have learned about the works.  With remaining class time, students will work on their Curatorial Project #1.
Rococo article
The Swing video
Enlightenment article
A Philosopher Giving a Lecture at the Orrery article
Thursday 1/5
Students will take Slide Quiz #10 at the beginning of class.
Students will complete their pair share activity with their graphic organizers on Slave Ship and The Oxbow.  When they have completed the activity we will discuss Realism, and students will read page 775 in the textbook and add facts on Realism into the "Artistic Movements Since 1700" Google presentation.  Mr. Lamp will then give a brief lecture on Realism and Gustave Courbet.  Students will read pages 775-777 on Courbet and complete The Stone Breakers graphic organizer.  We will briefly discuss the work.  Mr. Lamp will then give a brief introduction to Edouard Manet.​  Students will read pages 780-782 on Manet and complete the Olympia graphic organizer. 

Week of December 19-23, 2016

Monday 12/19
Students will take Slide Quiz #9 at the beginning of class.  Mr. Lamp will then give a short lecture on the Baroque in Italy and Spain, and we will complete a graphic organizer on Bernini's Ecstasy of Saint Teresa as a class.  We will then view Borromini's San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane and discuss how it differs from churches from the Medieval era and the Renaissance.  Students will watch a short video on Diego Velazquez's Las Meninas and we jigsaw the graphic organizer.
Thursday 12/21
Students will be introduced to Impressionism in class today.  They will begin by reading page 799 and 801 in the textbook and adding "Impressionism" to their "Artistic Movements Since 1700" Google presentation.  Mr. Lamp will then give a brief lecture on Impressionism and Claude Monet.  Students will then read page 803-804 on Monet's Saint-Lazare Train Station.  Mr. Lamp will give a brief lecture on Marxism and Darwinism, followed by Modernism, and Japonisme.  Students will then read an article on Mary Cassatt's The Coiffure and complete a graphic organizer on the work.  We will then briefly discuss color theory, and students will practice making art like an impressionist using pastels.  They must make a work that 1) does not use any pre-drawing 2) uses short, choppy brushstrokes; 3) uses the idea of optical mixture; 4) does not use black or grey shadows only; 5) uses reflective color.

Mary Cassat's The Coiffure article

Week of December 12-16, 2016

Tuesday 12/13
Students will discuss Titian and the Venus of Urbino with a partner, identifying the hallmarks of Titian's style.  After their discussion we will discuss, as a class, the hallmarks of Titian's style and the differences between Venetian and Florentine painters during the Renaissance.  Mr. Lamp will give a short lecture on Mannerism, and we will look at Pontormo's Entombment of Christ, Parmigianino, Tintoretto, and the architecture of Romano to illustrate the style of Mannerism.

Thursday 12/15
*Mr. Lamp absent*
Students will learn about the High Renaissance and Mannerism in Northern Europe and Spain.  At the beginning of class students will take Slide Quiz #8 online.  When finished, they will work on the "High Renaissance in Northern Europe" Google doc that Mr. Lamp shared.  Students will read about Albrecht Durer and Adam and EveMatthais Grunewald and the Isenheim Altarpiece, Lucas Cranach the Elder and Allegory of Law and Gospeland Pieter Bruegel the Elder and Hunters in the Snow.

Week of December 5-9, 2016

Tuesday 12/6
Students will work with their groups on their assigned Renaissance Artist Presentations.  Presentations are due on Thursday, December 8.
Thursday 12/8
Students will present their Renaissance Artist Presentations to the class today.  We will look at Donatello's David, Brunelleschi's Pazzi Chapel, Leonardo's Last Supper, Raphael's School of Athens, and Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel ceiling frescoes.  Students will complete graphic organizers on all of the works presented and complete ArtistBook pages for the artists.

Week of November 28 - December 2, 2016

Monday 11/28
Students will begin class by watching a short video on the Renaissance.  We will then do a "What Do You See" activity with Giotto's Lamentation and how it compares to earlier Medieval art.  Students will also compare and contrast Cimabue's Madonna Enthroned with Angels and Prophets and Giotto's Madonna Enthroned.  Mr. Lamp will give a short lecture on Late Medieval art and humanism.  Students will then read pages 401 and 407-409 in the text book and complete an ArtistBook organizer on Giotto and a graphic organizer on Lamentation from the Arena Chapel.
Wednesday 11/30
Students will watch a short, introductory video on the Renaissance.  We will then look at Robert Campin's Annunciation Triptych and do a "What do you See?" activity.  Students will then read about the work, and AP students will complete the graphic organizer on the altarpiece.  Mr. Lamp will present a short lecture on the Early Renaissance in Northern Europe, and we will view a video on oil painting (below).  Students will then discuss with a partner what they see in Jan van Eyck's The Arnolfini Portrait.  Everyone will watch a video on The Arnolfini Portrait, read pages 538-543 in the textbook, and complete the graphic organizer on The Arnolfini Portrait.
Friday 12/2
Students will take Slide Quiz #7 at the beginning of class.  After the quiz they will read page 559 in the textbook and we will discuss their findings from the short reading.  Mr. Lamp will then give the Renaissance theme and briefly discuss the Renaissance and perspective.  Students will then work on the "Renaissance Scavenger Hunt" Google presentation independently.  Mr. Lamp will assign groups for the Renaissance presentation at the end of class. 

Week of November 21-25, 2016

Monday 11/21
Students will learn about Hinduism today in class.  They will begin by reading page 435 on Hinduism and we will watch a brief introductory video on the religion.  They will then do a compare/contrast activity on Hinduism and Buddhism using a Venn diagram.
Students will then complete a Google Doc on the Lakshmana Temple in class.  When they finished the assignment, Mr. Lamp will lecture on Shiva as Lord of Dance.
​Laksmana Temple article on Khan Academy

Week of November 14-18, 2016

Tuesday 11/15
Students will begin class by reading pages 423 and 427 in the textbook and learning about Buddhism.  They will take notes on the Four Noble Truths and other important Buddhist ideas.  We will then watch a short video on Buddhism.
Students will then be assigned a "Buddhist Architectural Presentation."  This will be located on Google Classroom.  They will present information on the Great Stupa at Sanchi, Borobudur Temple, Todai-ji, and Ryoan-ji.
Thursday 11/17
Students will present their group presentations on their specific Buddhist site.

Week of November 7-11, 2016

Monday 11/7
Students will learn about mosque architecture today in class.  They will complete an assignment on Google Classroom titled "Mosque Architecture" at the beginning of class.  Next, we will watch a video on the Great Mosque in Cordoba, and students will complete a Google Doc on the site.  At the end of the hour, students will read about Islamic Luxury Arts in the textbook and complete a graphic organizer on the Pyxis of al-Mughira.

Wednesday 11/9
Students will learn about more Muslim sacred spaces today in class.  Mr. Lamp will briefly lecture on the Kaaba while students complete a graphic organizer.  After the lecture, students will break into partners.  Some students will read about the Great Mosque in Djenne and the other students will read about The Dome of the Rock.  After the reading students will discuss their architectural site with each other.  At the end of class we will discuss what they learned as a group.

Friday 11/11
Students will be on a field trip to Chicago today.  Students that do not go on the field trip will complete an assignment on Google Classroom called "Chicago Museums Virtual Visit."

Week of October 31 - November 4, 2016

Tuesday 10/31
Students will learn about Gothic art and architecture today in class.  They will begin by looking at images of Chartres Cathedral and discussing how it is different from Romanesque churches we looked at last class.
Thursday 11/3
Slide Quiz #6 on Christian Church Architecture
Students will learn about Islam and mosque architecture today in class.  After the quiz, students will read an article about Islam (linked below).  They will then visit diffen.com to compare and contrast Islam with Christianity on a Venn diagram.  We will discuss their comparisons as a class to better understand the two religions.  After the discussion, Mr. Lamp will lecture on Islam, mosque architecture, and Islamic luxury arts.
Introduction to Islam
The Five Pillars of Islam

Week of October 24-28, 2016

Monday 10/24
Students will begin class by completing a Google Doc on Santa Sabina.  When they complete the Google Doc they will complete the definitions of nave, arcade, apse, and aisles on their "Christian Church Architecture" presentations.  Mr. Lamp will present Byzantium and students will take notes on the historical context of the period.  After the lecture, students will read pages 240-241 in the textbook on early representations of Christ in Christian art.
Wednesday 10/26
Students will by introduced to Byzantium today in class.  We will begin by doing a compare/contrast activity on San Vitale and Hagia Sophia.  Students will then read about one of the two churches, take notes, and engage in a pair share activity with a partner.  At the end of class Mr. Lamp will discuss Virgin (Theotokos) and Child between Saints George and Theodore.  We will also discuss iconoclasm during this time period.

Friday 10/28
Students will be introduced to the Romanesque period today in class.  They will begin by continuing their "Christian Church Architecture" presentation and adding terms from the Romanesque period.  We will then view a floor plan of a church and discuss how their terms appear on a plan.  Next, we will tour the school and discuss how these terms work in our building.  Mr. Lamp will then briefly introduce the Romanesque period.  Students will then read about the reliquary of Sainte-Foy and the Crusades. 

Week of October 17-21, 2016

Tuesday 10/18
Mr. Lamp will discuss the beginnings of Christianity, specifically in the Roman Empire.  Students will read two brief articles on the spread of Christianity and the evolution of the Christian church.  After the students have read the two articles, they will work on their newly assigned "Christian Church Architecture" presentation.  This will be done on a Google presentation.  Students will need to define, nave, arcade, apse, and aisles.  With remaining time, they will begin the Google Doc on Santa Sabina.

Article on Spread of Christianity
Article on Early Christian Architecture

Week of October 10-14, 2016

Monday 10/10
Students will take Slide Quiz #5 on Roman Art
After the slide quiz, Mr. Lamp will lead a brief discussion on houses.  Students will complete a Google Doc on The House of the Vettii, print the document, and label the floor plan.  When complete, we will have a discussion on the function of the Roman house, how it is different and similar to modern residences, and the different types of wall paintings used in Roman homes.

Wednesday 10/12
Mr. Lamp will introduce the "Roman Architecture Presentation" assignment.  Students will be placed in groups and assigned a famous Roman architectural site - the Pantheon, the Colosseum (Flavian Amphitheater), or the Forum of Trajan.  See the Google Doc on the Google Classroom page for more information.  Students will spend the rest of class creating presentations.

Friday 10/14
Students will have the first 15 minutes of class to complete their presentations and handouts.  Then, students will give a group presentation on their assigned Roman site.

Week of October 3-7, 2016

Tuesday 10/4
Students will take Slide Quiz #4 on Greek Art
After the slide quiz, students will learn about our final subject of Greek art - pottery.  They will engage in an activity to understand the difference between red and black figure pottery.  After the activity they will watch a video on the Niobides Krater on Khan Academy and complete the graphic organizer on the work.
With the remaining time, students will be introduced to the historical context on ancient Rome.
Thursday 10/6
Students will learn about art from ancient Rome today in class.  Mr. Lamp will present a basic overview of Roman history and influence on society.  We will then compare and contrast the Head of a Roman Patrician and Augustus of Prima Porta.  Students will read an article, the textbook, and watch a video on their assigned work and complete a graphic organizer for one of the works, then discuss the work with a partner.  We will have a full class discussion on the works.  Next, Mr. Lamp will discuss Roman houses.  After the discussion, students will complete a Google Doc on the House of the Vettii.

Head of a Roman Patrician article
Augustus of Prima Porta article

Homework:
Complete the Google Doc on the House of the Vettii and print it out for next class

Week of September 26-30, 2016

Monday 9/26
Students will begin learning about art from ancient Greece today in class.  We will begin by discussing what we know and what we would like to learn about ancient Greece, followed by a brief introductory video.  Mr. Lamp will then introduce the Geometric and Orientalizing periods of Greek art.  We will then look at the New York Kouros and discuss its similarities to Egyptian statuary.  After the discussion students will complete a graphic organizer on either the Anavysos Kouros or the Peplos Kore.  They will then engage in a pair share activity on the works.  At the end of class, Mr. Lamp will introduce Polykleitos's Doryphoros.
Wednesday 9/28
Students will take Slide Quiz #3 on Greek Art
After the quiz, students will take notes on the difference between Doric and Ionic columns and temple designs.  Mr. Lamp will then briefly discuss the historical and political context on the Athenian Acropolis.  After the presentation, students will be placed into groups and create a presentation on a specific section of the Athenian Acropolis.

Friday 9/30
Student Presentations on the Athenian Acropolis
Students will give their presentations on the Athenian Acropolis at the beginning of class.  After the presentations, Mr. Lamp will introduce the Athenian Agora, and we will discuss how it interacted with the Acropolis during the Panathenaic Festival.  We will then discuss the evolution of Greek sculpture from the Archaic to the Classical and finally to the Hellenistic period.  
Homework:
Read pages 158-162 and complete the graphic organizer on the Seated boxer

Week of September 19-23, 2016

Tuesday 9/20
We will begin by reviewing the Google Doc on The Great Pyramids and Great Sphinx at the beginning of class.  Students will then watch a video on Hatshepsut from Khan Academy.  They will complete a Google Doc on the Mortuary temple of Hatshepsut and discuss the structure with a partner.  Next, students will read about Ahkenaton and the Amarna period in the textbook, and we will discuss stylistic differences between the Amarna period and previous Egyptian works.  We will end class by viewing the work, Ahkenaton, Nefertiti, and three daughters and complete a graphic organizer on the work.
Thursday 9/22
Students will take Slide Quiz #2 on Egyptian Art.  
After the slide quiz we will view two works on the subject of death and the afterlife in Egyptian art.  Students will read about the Tutankhamun's tomb and complete a graphic organizer on the work.  Mr. Lamp will discuss important aspects of the famous sarcophagus.  Next, students will read about the Last judgment of Hu-Nefer in the textbook.  We will reenact the famous work with students playing roles from the work.

Week of September 12-16, 2016

Monday 9/12
Students will discuss and theorize how Stonehenge was created using available technology during the Neolithic era.  We will also learn more about Stonehenge by viewing videos about the site and discussing theories on its creation and purpose.
Questions for Stonehenge discussion:
What do we know about Stonehenge?
What stones were used to create the site and how much did they weigh?
How were the stones transported?  What tools did they use to move the stones?
How did they get the large stones to stand vertically?
How did they create post and lintels with these large stones?
What was the purpose of this site?
We will also watch a video on the Jade congand complete a graphic organizer on the work.

Homework:
Complete the Google Doc on Stonehenge, this must be printed out for next class
Slide Quiz #1 on Prehistoric Art next class
Wednesday 9/14
Students will take Slide Quiz #1 on prehistoric art.
After the quiz they will do a prior knowledge sheet on Egypt.  Students will then read pages 55, 57-58 on the Palette of King Narmer and take notes on the content of the work and the Egyptian pictorial conventions.  We will discuss the conventions.  Students will then complete a Venn diagram on King Menkaura and queen and the Seated scribe, based solely on formal qualities of the works.  They will then be assigned to read a section of the book and complete a graphic organizer for one of the works.  Students will teach each other about the works when finished.
Link to King Menkaura and queen article

​Homework:
Complete the graphic organizer on the work assigned in class.
Friday 9/16
Students will continue their studies of Egyptian art today in class.  We will begin by doing a pair share activity on King Menkaura and queen and the Seated scribe.  Students will meet each other and discuss the works they studied, then they will teach another student about their assigned work.  After working together with a partner, we will have a class discussion about the two sculptures and discuss how class affected aesthetics in Egypt.
Students will then speculate on the creation of the Great Pyramids.  We will brainstorm as a class, and then watch short videos on scientific speculation on the creation of the Great Pyramids.  Students will have the remainder of class to work on a Google Doc on the Great Pyramids and Great Sphinx.

Homework:
Complete the Google Doc on the Great Pyramids and Great Sphinx

Week of September 5-9, 2016

Tuesday 9/6
Students will be introduced to the basics of Art History and what Art Historians do.  They will also be introduced to the digital resources for this class: Google Classroom, the Weebly website, the digital text book, "The 250" PowerPoint, and Khan Academy.  

Thursday 9/8
Students will view and discuss works of art from the Paleolithic era today in class.  They will also learn how to use the graphic organizer system for breaking down works of art, and we will discuss the Apollo 11 stones.
Apollo 11 stones Khan Academy article
After students have learned to use the organizer, they will read about the prehistoric cave painting on pages 20-23 and an article on the Great Hall of the Bulls and complete the organizer.  They will then discuss the work with a partner.
Great Hall of the Bulls Khan Academy article

Week of August 29 - September 2, 2016

Thursday 9/1
Students will be introduced to the discipline of Art History and discuss why they signed up to take the class.  They will receive their text books and begin looking through the text.

Assessment in This Class

In this class you will be graded on 4 Reportable Standards (listed below).  You will demonstrate your knowledge on each of the standards through quizzes, essays, projects, presentations, and assignments on specific works of art.

Reportable Standard 1: Connect works of art to specific artists, movements, locations, media, and times.

Reportable Standard 2: Connect artists and their work to societal, cultural, and historical context.

Reportable Standard 3: Respond to works of art by interpreting the artist's intent and meaning.

Reportable Standard 4: Present and analyze connections between works of art from different artists, movements, times, and locations.

Links for Art History

Content Areas

The following provides a general guideline to writing an art history paper and the various components you should include in your essay:

Title – Choose a title that reflects what your paper is about. The title is the first thing we read so you want to make it interesting and stimulating.

Title Page – Centre the title and your name. Put the course, instructor and date on the lower right hand corner.

Titles of Artworks – always underline or italicize, don’t put them in quotation marks. E.g. The Luncheon of the Boating Party by Renoir.

Illustrations must be included.

Topic

There may be a list from which you pick. Your treatment of the topic is what will count. Choose something that is of interest to you. This may or may not mean something that you like. Remember that part of your objective is to gain the reader’s interest as well. You will want to explain why your choice is interesting on grounds, which may include, but go beyond personal taste. You may want to confront the fact that informed curators, after careful deliberation, decided the piece of art in question is a good piece of art to present to the public. How might they have made their case? Are there reasons to disagree with the curator? Write about something that challenges you and the reader intellectually.

Consider getting your reader’s attention by framing your thesis as a question for the jury. Weigh the evidence. Direct the reader to essential facts, expert opinion and relevant schools of thought. Clarify. Identify views you feel are controversial or most open for interpretation. Are there observable details in the work you are examining that, when brought into closer focus, cause us to reassess a prevailing view or probable first impression. Examine. Then cross-examine. Get comfortable with presenting different sides of an issue, disciplined inquiry, and debate. Think boldly. Explore your topic. Your challenge is to lead our eyes and our sense of reason depending on your skills with words and the disciplines of argument. Tell us why your way of “connecting the dots” is the one to support even as we recognize the field of competing arguments around your topic may be rich with commentary – often illuminating, but sometimes daunting. Do not worry about having the last word. Do worry about being organized and showing it. Draw on your course material to define and prioritize relevant issues. Show that you understand how to construct logical support for your conclusions - whether they flirt with tentative and unorthodox opinions or bring us back to the mainstream consensus - and your practical reward will ultimately be much more than a positive grade.

Thesis

Have something to say in your paper. What does this mean? Strictly speaking, your thesis consists of the central idea or point of inquiry you wish to pursue about your topic. Keep in mind that your thesis need not be grand but it must be clearly and distinctly stated from the outset. However, if the reader is to attach any weight to what it is you are proposing you must be sure you have provided suitable support. You must develop your thesis in a logical way arguing point by point, pro and con, as space allows. The challenge is to state, unfold and conclude your thesis in an integrated way. It is on examining your supporting discussion that the serious reader will decide whether you, indeed, have something to say worthy of merit.

Introduction

You should have an introduction that clearly states how you are going to approach the topic. Clearly state your thesis. But also try to make your introduction engaging, perhaps even provocative. Work carefully on it. Would someone what to continue reading after reading your introduction? So you want to accomplish two things: guide the reader so they understand generally what you are going to do in this paper and, two, awaken the reader’s spirit of inquiry.

Conclusion

Sum up your ideas at the end of the paper. Show how things tie together. This is your opportunity to really hit your thesis home and end on a compelling note.

Punctuation and Grammar. If you are at all unsure of how to use commas, semi-colons, sentence structure, use your Desk Reference. Check out the section on grammar and language usage.

Spelling – Proofread your essay carefully and use a dictionary or spell check if you are at all unsure about the spelling of words.

Bibliography – Even if you only use your textbook for research, this should be included in your bibliography.

Sources – If you use any ideas or quotes in the body of your essay from other sources, they must be referenced in proper academic form.

Interpretation and Visual Information

I am not so much interested that you get the “right” interpretation but that you recognize that artworks are open. Ask some hard questions about the work. Become actively engaged with the piece, not a passive receptive respondent.

What is the title?

Does the title help you interpret what you see?

What is the subject matter of the piece?

What is the artist trying to say about the subject matter of the work? What feelings or attitudes does the composition seem to evoke? How would you interpret the artwork or architecture? Base your interpretation on what is in the artwork. Support your interpretation by staying with the artwork and avoid going off on a tangent about ideas or fantasies that artwork evokes for you. The first rule of thumb for the art historian is “stay with the artwork”!

What specific elements or design choices in the composition account for your interpretation or feeling you have about the piece? Is the composition balanced, symmetrical or asymmetrical? Do the various elements seem in proportion? Is there visual rhythm in the work? Are certain shapes and/or colours repeated? Is there variety and contract to maintain your interest? Where are the focal points within the artwork? Where is your eye led? If you are analyzing a building, consider the design of the space. For example, where does the design lead you? How do you feel as you approach the building? Are you overwhelmed in the space? Do you feel comfortable or relaxed? If so, why?

What formal elements are emphasized? Consider how colour, line, texture, shape and tonal values as relevant affect the piece. How are light and spaced used?

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