Zebra Short Story Essay Questions

Short Stories:

Our first short story is Seventh Grade by Gary Soto. 
We will compare his short story to his poem, "Oranges".
Here is a video that dramatizes Gary Soto's short story, Seventh Grade:
Here is the Literary Analysis for Seventh Grade:
how_do_you_make_a_good_first_impression.doc
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Here is a video of Gary Soto's poem, "Oranges", read aloud with accompanying images.
Here is the text of the poem, "Oranges" and the Poetry Analysis assignment.
Our second short story is Thank You, Ma'am by Langston Hughes.
We will compare his short story to Emily Dickenson's poem, "If I can stop one Heart from breaking".
Here is a video biography of Langston Hughes and his part of creating The Harlem Renaissance:
Here is a silent movie dramatizing Thank You, Ma'am:
Here is the Literary Analysis for Thank You, Ma'am:
thank_you_maam_literary_analysis.doc
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Here is a video interpretation of Emily Dickinson's poem, "If I can stop one Heart from Breaking".
Our third short story is Rikki Tikki Tavi by Rudyard Kipling.
We will compare his story to three lyric poems about nature that use personification.
Here is a video about a cobra fighting a mongoose:
Here are the texts of the lyric poems we are studying and the poetry analysis assessment:
Our fourth short story is Zebra by Chaim Potok.
We will compare Potok's short story to Naomi Shihab Nye's poem, "The Rider"
Here is a video about the Huey Helicopter and its use in the Vietnam War:
Here is a video about Maya Lin's architectural design for the Vietnam War Memorial:
Here is the Literary Analysis and final assessment for "Zebra":
Here is a video of some excellent bicycle riding:


Our fifth short story is: 
Encounter with Martin Luther King Jr. by Maya Angelou
We will compare her autobiographical piece with the memorandum, Unity of Emphasis, that Dr. King wrote to outline the Crusade for Citizenship Mass Meeting

Here is a short biography of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr.:


Here is a short biography of Maya Angelou:
Our sixth short story is Amigo Brothers by Piri Thomas


Here is an introductory video showing what New York City was like in the 1970s:


Click here to watch the "training montage" from the 1949 film, The Champion, starring Kirk Douglas.
Our seventh short story is Dark They Were, and Golden-Eyed 
by Ray Bradbury
We will compare the short story with a radio adaptation, a sci-fi film and the current project to establish human communities on Mars, "Mars One".

Here is a radio adaptation of the story that aired in the 1980s:
Below are the Common Core Standards Connected to the Short Stories Read and Studied:
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the 
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1b Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1c Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1d Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.2 Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.3 Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3a Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4b Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel).
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4c Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4d Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5b Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of the words.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5c Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
oranges_by_gary_soto.doc
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oranges_poem_analysis.doc
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lyric_poem_study_what_is_your_place_in_nature.doc
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three_lyric_poems_about_nature.doc
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what_has_the_power_to_heal_zebra.doc
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Follow this link to read 
Naomi Shihab Nye's poem, The Rider.
what_if_you_could_meet_your_hero_ml_king.doc
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unity_of_emphasis_memorandum.pdf
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Here is your assignment for Amigo Brothers:
Here is your assignment for "Dark They Were and Golden-Eyed":
ray_bradbury_dark_they_were.doc
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Here is a Mars One introductory video:
  • 1. 

    Who is the main character in the story?

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 2. 

    What do you learn about Zebra because of the character Andrea?

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

      His friends don’t speak to him.

  • 3. 

    At the end of the story, what does John Wilson do with Zebra’s drawing?A

    • A. 

      Keeps it in a collection of gifts

    • B. 

      Sends it to his friend, Leon Kellen

    • C. 

      Gives it to Mrs. English to display

    • D. 

      Frames it and hangs it in his studio

  • 4. 

    When Andrea tells Zebra that he is “becoming a pleasant life form,” she means he is

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

      Her best friend in school

    • D. 

  • 5. 

    Mrs. English is best classified as a minor character because she

    • A. 

      Offers Zebra patience and information about her own experiences, which helps him

    • B. 

      Mainly functions to help the reader learn more about Zebra and John Wilson

    • C. 

      Reveals how Zebra changes, as shown by her growing warmth toward him

    • D. 

      Grows and changes over the course of the story, just as Zebra himself does

  • 6. 

    Zebra can be classified as a dynamic character because he

    • A. 

      Develops a strong and vibrant personality as he learns about Vietnam

    • B. 

      Teaches readers to be grateful for their good health and happiness

    • C. 

      Changes through the story, shown by the improvement in his social skills

    • D. 

      Is the most important character in the story, as shown by the title

  • 7. 

    Which description best helps you visualize John Wilson’s age?

    • A. 

      “Wrinkles formed intricate spidery webs in the skin below his gray eyes.”

    • B. 

      “He picked up the bag and started down the street to where Zebra was standing.”

    • C. 

      “The dark-blue cap with the words LAND ROVER sat jauntily on his head.”

    • D. 

      “He stood alongside the front desk, wearing a light-blue long-sleeved shirt and jeans.”

  • 8. 

    Why doesn’t Mrs. English pick Zebra to take her class again?

    • A. 

      Mrs. English is upset with him for not trying harder in art.

    • B. 

      Zebra no longer needs the emotional support that the class provides.

    • C. 

      Zebra is admitted to the summer art class instead, as a reward.

    • D. 

      He applies too late in the year and the class is already full.

  • 9. 

    Which inference can you make about John Wilson as you visualize him from this description? “And his hand—how dirty it was, the fingers and palm smudged with black ink and encrusted with colors.”

    • A. 

      The dirt on his palm suggests that he is messy, careless, and not a very skilled artist.

    • B. 

      The fact that the colors are rubbed into his hand suggests he prefers paint to ink.

    • C. 

      His soiled palm suggests that he has an injured hand and paints with only one hand.

    • D. 

      His messy hand suggests that he paints so much that the ink and colors don’t wash off.

  • 10. 

    If you grimace, you show

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 11. 

    What is the meaning of somber?

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 12. 

    To chafe is to

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 13. 

    An intricate knot is

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 14. 

    What does contour mean?

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 15. 

    Diciplinarian

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 16. 

    Gaunt means

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 17. 

    Jauntily means

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 18. 

    Someone playing exuberantly is

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

  • 19. 

    What does wince mean?

    • A. 

    • B. 

    • C. 

    • D. 

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